Congress Members Push Biden Administration for Stricter Regulations on Chinese Technology

Republican lawmakers are criticizing the Biden administration’s enforcement of restrictions on China’s access to American technology, saying that America is still allowing semiconductors and American innovation to flow to Beijing that could ultimately aid China in a military conflict. In a report released on Thursday, the House Foreign Affairs Committee said the administration had failed to enforce export controls that limit sales of advanced technology to China. The federal government has been steadily ramping up limits on sales to China of advanced chips and chip-making equipment over the past few years. But Republican lawmakers said the administration had not done enough to enforce the rules and criticized the office in charge of policing export controls. In addition, the report said the administration had issued too many special licenses allowing American companies to export restricted products to China, in some cases issuing those exemptions over the objections of defense and intelligence officials. A statement from a spokesman for the Bureau of Industry and Security said that the Biden administration had been thoughtful and vigorous in expanding the restrictions, and had added more than 1,100 parties to a restricted trade list, including more than 300 firms and organizations in China. The semiconductor companies have pushed back against the restrictions, saying that overly broad controls could push China to develop its own technologies and ultimately undercut American industry leadership. Gina Raimondo, the secretary of commerce, said that the administration was “building a more muscular Commerce Department” to take on China, including issuing “historic controls” that for the first time denied an entire country specific technologies. However, she argued that her department was badly in need of funding to complete that mission. Several Republican lawmakers said Tuesday that they would withhold funding increases until the department changed its practices and moved forward with additional sanctions on Chinese companies like telecom giant Huawei. They cited government data showing that the agency had approved the sale of $60 billion in U.S. technology to Huawei over a six-month period in 2020 and 2021. The congressional report recommended a series of overhauls, including giving Defense Department officials a greater say in the approval of special licenses to supply technology to China. A House aide said the committee would begin working to craft legislation as early as next week, and to seek bipartisan support for the changes. The Biden administration recently restricted the export to China of an entire category of cutting-edge semiconductors used to create artificial intelligence, as well as the equipment to manufacture those chips. The administration also extended its rules extraterritorially, regulating products that use American technology but are manufactured outside the United States. Officials with the Bureau of Industry and Security have said they work closely with other government officials to carefully review licenses for sales to China. But critics say Biden officials have not gone far enough to restrain some of China’s most advanced firms, like Huawei or server make Inspur. Over the past year, the Biden administration considered clamping down on the special licenses that have allowed American companies to continue supplying certain goods to Huawei, but paused the effort this spring as it worked to mend ties with the Chinese government, according to people familiar with the matter. Some China critics also expressed outrage last month when the Biden administration rolled back a trade restriction on a Chinese institution accused of aiding human rights abuses in Xinjiang. The Chinese government had complained that the restrictions were an impediment to cooperation between the governments on restricting fentanyl. The fight over the Bureau of Industry and Security, formerly a relatively obscure agency, has grown more intense as its responsibilities have escalated in recent years. According to a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in comparison to the capacity of other governments, the bureau’s abilities were impressive. But the demands on the bureau had exploded after Russia invaded Ukraine and the Biden administration placed controls on China. The bureau was understaffed, and its technology and databases were outdated.

News

Moms Managing Girl Influencers: A Marketplace Stalked by Men

Elissa began receiving threatening messages early last year from a person calling themselves “Instamodelfan” targeting her daughter’s Instagram account. Despite having over 100,000 followers, the account has been under scrutiny for potentially exploiting children in exchange for money. However, the issue runs deeper than that. Research from The New York Times found that the platform […]

Read More
News

Insights from The Times’s Investigation of Child Influencers

Instagram maintains the 13-year-old minimum age for accounts, but parents can take control, largely for their daughters’ ambitions to become influencers. Parents initiate their child’s modeling career or gain favor from clothing brands, but a dark subculture emerges, controlled by men attracted to minors, as per The New York Times. The emergence of mom-run profiles […]

Read More
News

Rising Threat: China’s Growing Cyber Espionage and the New Vulnerability

Beijing’s Networks Expanding Hacking Efforts China has spread its hacking reach with new tools that exploit computer vulnerabilities and a network of contracted vendors. The large scale of China’s hacking operations poses a significant threat, with the FBI reporting China’s hacking program to be larger than all major nations combined. The U.S. has tracked consistent […]

Read More