Lost and Found: How I Got My Phone Back from a Budget Employee

Dear Tripped Up, I had a problem returning a rental car in July at Boston Logan International Airport. I lost my iPhone at Budget’s location. Even though I traced the phone using Apple’s Find My application, it was traveling from an apartment building in Lynn, Mass., to the Budget office at Logan. I reported this to both Budget and the police, but the police wouldn’t help without the name of any employees who lived at that address, and Budget wouldn’t give it to them. I want Budget to return my phone or pay for a replacement. Can you help? John, Jacksonville, Fla.

Dear Budget John, I’m sorry to hear about your iPhone. Another traveler named John had a similar problem, but in Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Alamo John called a number saved in his lost phone and found out it was the employee. He reported this to the rental-car agency, but Alamo repeatedly told him they hadn’t found his phone. After writing to Budget and Alamo, the companies quickly apologized and reimbursed the cost of new iPhones — $1,076 for you, Budget John, and $770 for your Alamo counterpart.

The response did not answer my questions about why Budget failed to report the theft to the police, what went wrong, and whether they disciplined or fired any employees. I hope they also include cooperating with the police when a customer provides the likely address of the person who may have stolen a phone. Unfortunately, Budget and Alamo have not provided answers to these questions. If you need advice about a travel plan that went awry, send an email to TrippedUp@nytimes.com.

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