Russian Intelligence-Linked Group Hacks Microsoft Executives’ Emails

The blog post and regulatory filing from Microsoft revealed that a Russian intelligence-backed hacking group gained access to the emails of some of the company’s top executives starting in late November. The intrusion was discovered a week ago, and Microsoft is still investigating. The hackers focused on searching through corporate email accounts for information related to the group known as Midnight Blizzard, looking through emails from senior leadership and employees in cybersecurity, legal, and other departments, and taking some emails and attachments. The Russian Foreign Intelligence Service has been running the hacking group since at least 2008, and the group has been behind high-profile hacks in the past. Previous targets have included the Democratic National Committee in 2015 and the tech supplier SolarWinds, leading to access to systems at the State Department, Department of Homeland Security, and parts of the Pentagon in 2020. Microsoft called this incident “the most sophisticated nation-state cyberattack in history.” The hackers used a relatively basic tactic called password spraying to gain access to the corporate email accounts through an old account for a testing system. Microsoft stated that there is no evidence that the hackers had access to customer environments, production systems, source code, or A.I. systems. The company has notified law enforcement and is working with them. Microsoft, which provides technology to many Western governments, has long been a target of nation-state hacking, with Chinese hackers breaching the company’s systems and gaining access to the email accounts of government officials last year.

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Moms Managing Girl Influencers: A Marketplace Stalked by Men

Elissa began receiving threatening messages early last year from a person calling themselves “Instamodelfan” targeting her daughter’s Instagram account. Despite having over 100,000 followers, the account has been under scrutiny for potentially exploiting children in exchange for money. However, the issue runs deeper than that. Research from The New York Times found that the platform […]

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Insights from The Times’s Investigation of Child Influencers

Instagram maintains the 13-year-old minimum age for accounts, but parents can take control, largely for their daughters’ ambitions to become influencers. Parents initiate their child’s modeling career or gain favor from clothing brands, but a dark subculture emerges, controlled by men attracted to minors, as per The New York Times. The emergence of mom-run profiles […]

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Rising Threat: China’s Growing Cyber Espionage and the New Vulnerability

Beijing’s Networks Expanding Hacking Efforts China has spread its hacking reach with new tools that exploit computer vulnerabilities and a network of contracted vendors. The large scale of China’s hacking operations poses a significant threat, with the FBI reporting China’s hacking program to be larger than all major nations combined. The U.S. has tracked consistent […]

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