Streaming Platforms Gain Confidence from Studios in Show Distribution

For many years, entertainment companies were happily licensing classic movies and television shows to Netflix. Both Netflix and entertainment companies were benefitting from the arrangement, as the streaming service received popular content like “Friends” and Disney’s “Moana,” while companies received a substantial amount of money. But around five years ago, executives began to realize they were providing valuable content to a strong competitor rather than building their own streaming services, leading to the slowing down of content licensing.

However, the harsh realities of streaming – such as significant debt burdens and streaming services that don’t make much money – have led companies like Disney and Warner Bros. Discovery to loosen their restrictions on licensing content to Netflix to generate much-needed revenue. Companies like Disney will begin sending a number of shows from its catalog to Netflix, including popular titles like “This Is Us” and “Prison Break.” These companies are making a financial necessity to compete in the streaming industry and are looking to their existing content to help create new revenue streams.

Despite the increase in licensed content on its service, Netflix does not see a need to reciprocate by licensing its original series to other companies. The streaming giant has thus far benefitted from licensing content from other studios to populate its service with established favorites to compliment its original programming. This arrangement has enabled Netflix to offer well-known titles to its subscribers, allowing the service to maintain popularity and increase viewership.

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Moms Managing Girl Influencers: A Marketplace Stalked by Men

Elissa began receiving threatening messages early last year from a person calling themselves “Instamodelfan” targeting her daughter’s Instagram account. Despite having over 100,000 followers, the account has been under scrutiny for potentially exploiting children in exchange for money. However, the issue runs deeper than that. Research from The New York Times found that the platform […]

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Insights from The Times’s Investigation of Child Influencers

Instagram maintains the 13-year-old minimum age for accounts, but parents can take control, largely for their daughters’ ambitions to become influencers. Parents initiate their child’s modeling career or gain favor from clothing brands, but a dark subculture emerges, controlled by men attracted to minors, as per The New York Times. The emergence of mom-run profiles […]

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Rising Threat: China’s Growing Cyber Espionage and the New Vulnerability

Beijing’s Networks Expanding Hacking Efforts China has spread its hacking reach with new tools that exploit computer vulnerabilities and a network of contracted vendors. The large scale of China’s hacking operations poses a significant threat, with the FBI reporting China’s hacking program to be larger than all major nations combined. The U.S. has tracked consistent […]

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